Rabies Vaccine and Your Pet

Cats, Dogs, Infectious Diseases

The rabies virus is carried by wild animals and spread through saliva – most commonly via the bites or scratches of infected animals. Dogs are the most frequent carriers worldwide but in this country, where we routinely vaccinate dogs, the most common carriers are bats. The disease is always fatal once symptoms appear and can only be prevented through vaccination either prior to, or immediately after exposure.

Signs of Rabies

Rabies affects the nervous system and signs include hydrophobia (fear of water), violent behavior, confusion, uncontrollable excitement, paralysis and unconsciousness. If you ever encounter a wild animal or a feral dog or cat you should call animal control. Do not approach them. Animals with rabies may not show a normal fear of humans and may attack unpredictably.

Who should receive a rabies vaccine?

We vaccinate dogs, cats, ferrets and livestock animals because they are more likely to be exposed to wild animals. In addition to pets and other animals, veterinarians and animal control workers who may be exposed to rabies are routinely vaccinated.

How often should a pet be vaccinated against rabies?

The vaccine used at EMRVC is initially effective for one year then boostered every three years. Rabies vaccination is required by law and a valid rabies certificate must be obtained in order to license a dog or cat. While rabies is rare in this country, it is always fatal and if an unvaccinated animal is exposed they may have to be euthanized or quarantined depending on the circumstances.

The risk of rabies may be low but the consequences of contracting it are dire, so all pets should be vaccinated regularly.

– Dr. Shawn Budge

Essex Middle River Veterinary Center provides medical and surgical care for cats and dogs at our animal hospital and veterinary clinic in Essex, Maryland, just outside of Baltimore. Our services include preventive wellness care exams, vaccines, spays/neuters, and a variety of specialized care. Our state-of-the-art veterinary offices are conveniently located near I-695 where we see pets from Towson, Honeygo, White Marsh, and other neighboring Baltimore areas.

Rabies Vaccine and Your Pet

The rabies virus is carried by wild animals and spread through saliva - most commonly via the bites or scratches of infected animals. Dogs are the most frequent carriers worldwide but in this country, where we routinely vaccinate dogs, the most common carriers are...

Tips for Traveling with Your Pet

More people are traveling by car this summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you are bringing your pet with you, planning ahead will make the adventure safe and enjoyable for your furry family member. Pet Travel Tips from your Veterinarian If traveling by car we do...

This Summer, Keep Your Dog Safe From Heat and Free From Fear of Fireworks

As July 4th and summer is approaching, it’s a good time to get educated on the latest recommendations to keep your dog safe from overheating, and free from anxiety caused by fireworks. Fireworks Are No Fun For Most Dogs A recent study showed that 3 out 4 dogs are...

My Dog Has Stomach Pain. Could it Be Pancreatitis?

Pancreatitis is a painful condition that afflicts some dogs. There are quite a few different causes of pancreatitis: Trauma, cancer, breed-specific conditions, and diet are all known causes. For the purpose of this post, we will focus on dietary related pancreatitis....

More Resource Categories:

Thanksgiving Safety Tips for Cats and Dogs

The holidays are a fun time shared with friends and family. By following some of the guidelines below from the AVMA,...

How to Make Sure Your Pet Has a Good St. Patrick’s Day

Your beer is green, and your plate is full of cabbage and corned beef — It must be St. Patrick’s Day! No matter how...
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

We will be closed today, Wednesday, September 23 from 12:30-2:30 for our monthly staff meeting. If you have a pet emergency, please call or go directly to:
Pet ER - 410-252-8387 or
Animal Emergency Hospital - 410-420-7297
... See MoreSee Less

We will be closed today, Wednesday, September 23 from 12:30-2:30 for our monthly staff meeting. If you have a pet emergency, please call or go directly to:
Pet ER - 410-252-8387 or
Animal Emergency Hospital - 410-420-7297

We will be closed today, Friday, September 11 from 1:30-2:30 for our monthly department meetings. If you have a pet emergency, please call or go directly to:
Pet ER - 410-252-8387 or
Animal Emergency Hospital - 410-420-7297
... See MoreSee Less

We will be closed today, Friday, September 11 from 1:30-2:30 for our monthly department meetings. If you have a pet emergency, please call or go directly to:
Pet ER - 410-252-8387 or
Animal Emergency Hospital - 410-420-7297

Our phones and computers are back up and running - thanks for your patience!!! ... See MoreSee Less

Load more