How To Plan Pet-Safe New Years Celebrations

Behavior, Cats, Dogs

New Years celebrations are usually not as fun for our pets as they are for us. The loud noises cause cats and dogs considerable distress. The following tips from the ASPCA will help make the evening a little better for them:

Give Pets a Safe Space

Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub. Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle.

Let Your Guests Show a Little Love

If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you’re busy tending to the party, make sure your pet doesn’t seem stressed. Instruct your guest to start a nice play or petting session with your animal, and make sure they don’t overwhelm your pet.

Hide All Medications

Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.

Be Careful With Confetti

As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat’s intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery.

Loud Noises

Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears. And, remember that many pets are also scared of fireworks, so be sure to secure pets in a safe, escape-proof area as midnight approaches.

You also might consider buying your dog a Thundershirt, or similar garment designed to calm their noise-based anxieties.

EMRVC is always here to answer your questions about providing your pet the best possible home. Contact us today!

Essex Middle River Veterinary Center provides medical and surgical care for cats and dogs at our animal hospital and veterinary clinic in Essex, Maryland, just outside of Baltimore. Our services include preventive wellness care exams, vaccines, spays/neuters, and a variety of specialized care. Our state-of-the-art veterinary offices are conveniently located near I-695 where we see pets from Towson, Honeygo, White Marsh, and other neighboring Baltimore areas.

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According to Merriam/Webster Dictionary - mutt is defined as:
Mutt can now be used with either affection or disdain to refer to a dog that is not purebred, but in the word's early history, in the U.S. around the turn of the 20th century, it could also be used to describe a person - and not kindly: "mutt" was another word for "fool." The word's history lies in another insult. It comes from "muttonhead," another Americanism that also means essentially "fool." "Muttonhead" had been around since the early 19th century but it was not unlike an older insult with the same meaning: people had been calling one another "sheep's heads" since the mid-16th century.
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