What You Need to Know About Traveling With a Pet

Cats, Dogs

Traveling with a pet isn’t easy. Thankfully, you aren’t the first person to try it. To help you through the preparations, we’ve compiled this list of tips from the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Obtain a health certificate

Your pet may need a health certificate from your veterinarian if you’re traveling across state lines or international borders, whether by air or car. Learn the requirements for any states you will visit or pass through, and schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to get the needed certificate within the timeframes required by those states.

Each state or country will have different requirements, please be sure to do your research within plenty of time of travel as there are very specific guidelines that may need to be met.

Practice Car Safety

Never leave pets alone in vehicles, even for a short time, regardless of the weather.

Also, your pet should always be safely restrained while driving. This means using a secure harness or a carrier, placed in a location clear of airbags. This helps protect your pets if you brake or swerve suddenly, or get in an accident. It also keeps them from getting into any dangerous food or items you are transporting. Perhaps most importantly, a properly secured pet can’t distract you from driving.

Prepping Your Pet for Air Travel

Talk with your veterinarian if you’re traveling by air and considering bringing your pet with you. Air travel can put pets at risk, expecially short-nosed dogs. Your veterinarian is the best person to advise you regarding your own pet’s ability to travel.

Pack for your pet as well as yourself if you’re going to travel together. In addition to your pet’s food and medications, this includes bringing medical records, information to help identify your pet if it becomes lost, first aid supplies, and other items.

Consider Boarding Your Dog While You Travel

Talk with your veterinarian to find out how best to protect your pet from canine flu and other contagious diseases, and to make sure your pet is up-to-date on vaccines.

EMRVC can help you prepare for your upcoming travel. Contact us today to set up an appointment!

Essex Middle River Veterinary Center provides medical and surgical care for cats and dogs at our animal hospital and veterinary clinic in Essex, Maryland, just outside of Baltimore. Our services include preventive wellness care exams, vaccines, spays/neuters, and a variety of specialized care. Our state-of-the-art veterinary offices are conveniently located near I-695 where we see pets from Towson, Honeygo, White Marsh, and other neighboring Baltimore areas.

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