Help! Recently My Cat Has Been Peeing Around The House

Behavior, Cats

Although cats are known as being highly clean animals, one of the most common reasons they are brought to the vet is for urinating outside of the litter box (known as ‘’house soiling’’ or ‘’inappropriate urination’’). This is a frustrating issue, so the sooner you identify the underlying cause, the better the outcome for all involved. There are numerous reasons why this may occur, but it is commonly broken down between medical causes and behavioral causes.

If Your Cat is Peeing Outside the Box It Could Have a Bladder Infection

It is thought that if a cat is urinating outside of the box, it must have developed a urinary tract infection. However, urinary tract infections are actually fairly rare in cats, though we can see them in senior cats, or secondary to another health condition. What we more commonly diagnose is cystitis, an inflammatory condition of the bladder.

Blood In the Urine Indicates Kidney Trouble

Along with urinating in abnormal locations, we might see straining when urinating, blood in the urine, or frequent small urinations. Bladder stones are another medical reason for house soiling and will present similarly to cystitis. Obtaining a urine sample to perform a urinalysis is the first step in diagnosis. From there, imaging (ultrasound or x-rays) is needed to rule out stones. Male cats are at risk for a urethral obstruction in both of these conditions (becoming ‘’blocked’’), so a correct diagnosis and initiating treatment is important to prevent a more severe scenario.

Other Possible Causes of Cats Peeing Outside the Box

  • We also see something called polyuria, which is urinating large quantities. Because of the volume of urine being produced, it may stimulate a cat to urinate in other locations. We see this secondary to diabetes, kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, and several other diseases. Blood work (along with a urinalysis) is necessary to identify the cause in these cases.
  • A medical cause that is often overlooked is pain or arthritis. Cats will hide signs of pain, so we can miss it when it is present. If it is too uncomfortable for a cat to move to where the box is located, or to climb inside of the box, they will choose a different location.
  • Behavioral house soiling can be a sign of stress to something in a cat’s environment. Triggers can include a new home, new pet, new roommates, construction nearby, and stray cats in the neighborhood. An aversion to the litter box itself is also possible. The cat may find fault with the location of the box, the type of litter substrate, the cleanliness of the box, or the size or shape of it.

In all of these cases, there are treatment options available. The best way to handle this problem is to have your cat examined. From there, it can be determined what diagnostics should be performed and which treatments are likely to help. Please call us at 410-687-1111 to schedule an appointment for your feline family member.

Essex Middle River Veterinary Center provides medical and surgical care for cats and dogs at our animal hospital and veterinary clinic in Essex, Maryland, just outside of Baltimore. Our services include preventive wellness care exams, vaccines, spays/neuters, and a variety of specialized care. Our state-of-the-art veterinary offices are conveniently located near I-695 where we see pets from Towson, Honeygo, White Marsh, and other neighboring Baltimore areas.

Tips for Traveling with Your Pet

More people are traveling by car this summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you are bringing your pet with you, planning ahead will make the adventure safe and enjoyable for your furry family member. Pet Travel Tips from your Veterinarian If traveling by car we do...

This Summer, Keep Your Dog Safe From Heat and Free From Fear of Fireworks

As July 4th and summer is approaching, it’s a good time to get educated on the latest recommendations to keep your dog safe from overheating, and free from anxiety caused by fireworks. Fireworks Are No Fun For Most Dogs A recent study showed that 3 out 4 dogs are...

My Dog Has Stomach Pain. Could it Be Pancreatitis?

Pancreatitis is a painful condition that afflicts some dogs. There are quite a few different causes of pancreatitis: Trauma, cancer, breed-specific conditions, and diet are all known causes. For the purpose of this post, we will focus on dietary related pancreatitis....

Why Won’t My Dog Stop Scratching Itself? A Guide to Stopping the ItchY.

Can you guess the most common type of non-wellness appointment we see in practice this time of year? If you guessed some variation of itching, scratching, or skin irritation, you are right! Allergy Season Affects Pets, Too All dogs will scratch sometimes. But...

More Resource Categories:

Why Does My Healthy Pet Need a Wellness Screening?

Answer: Because when it comes to pets, not everything is always as it seems and a healthy exterior can hide troubling...

Is My Pet Obese?

Fat cats and big dogs might be fun internet memes, but overweight animals are no laughing matter. Why Pets Put on...
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Did you know?
According to Merriam/Webster Dictionary - mutt is defined as:
Mutt can now be used with either affection or disdain to refer to a dog that is not purebred, but in the word's early history, in the U.S. around the turn of the 20th century, it could also be used to describe a person - and not kindly: "mutt" was another word for "fool." The word's history lies in another insult. It comes from "muttonhead," another Americanism that also means essentially "fool." "Muttonhead" had been around since the early 19th century but it was not unlike an older insult with the same meaning: people had been calling one another "sheep's heads" since the mid-16th century.
... See MoreSee Less

Taylor”s baby is earning his allowance early ... See MoreSee Less

Taylor”s baby is earning his allowance early
Load more